Flash Flood Watch In Effect

Flash Flood Watch in effect for our far northern Alabama Coverage Area counties until 7:00 pm Sunday. Rainfall rates could be from 3-4 inches Saturday morning through Sunday evening, leading to the potential for flash flooding.

...FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT THROUGH SUNDAY EVENING...

The National Weather Service in Huntsville has issued a

* Flash Flood Watch for portions of Alabama and southern middle
  Tennessee, including the following areas, in Alabama, Colbert,
  DeKalb, Franklin AL, Jackson, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone,
  Madison, Marshall and Morgan. In southern middle Tennessee,
  Franklin TN, Lincoln and Moore.

* Through Sunday evening.

* Multiple rounds of heavy showers and thunderstorms this morning
  through Sunday evening are expected to produce flash flooding
  across the watch area. Widespread 3-4 inches of rain is forecast
  with localized higher amounts possible. Efficient rainfall rates
  may exceed 2 inches/hr. Runoff may also lead to rises on area
  rivers, creeks, and streams.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

You should monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action
should Flash Flood Warnings be issued.

Tropical Storm Ida Update

The center of Tropical Storm Ida is currently located near Jackson, MS with maximum wind speeds of 30 MPH. The Tropical Storm Warnings/Storm Surge Warnings are set to expire at 12:30pm. Ida wrecked havoc on New Orleans and knocked out power to 100% of the city, according to Entergy. For an update on restoration from Entergy, see this article:

Closer to home, we are expected to start feeling the impacts from Ida tonight. Wind Advisories and Flash Flood Watches are up for almost our entire Coverage Area:

Tropical Storm Ida – NWS Birmingham
Tropical Storm Ida – NWS Huntsville
Tropical Storm Ida Track – RadarOmega

RAINFALL: The biggest story of any Tropical System is the rainfall. We’re looking to receive anywhere from 4-6″ on the western half of the state, and 2-4″ elsewhere. Flash flooding will also be a concern in some areas that receive repeated heavy rainfall.

[Image of WPC QPF U.S. rainfall potential]
[Image of WPC Flash Flooding/Excessive Rainfall Outlook]

WINDS: Will begin to pick up as Ida nears. Currently the forecast is for 30+ MPH winds with gusts up to 40. Winds could be felt as early as 8:00 PM Monday for west/northwest Alabama. Winds of this magnitude can easily topple over trees and power lines. Trees with saturated ground could fall more easily.

time of arrival graphic

TORNADOES: With any tropical system – especially on the outer edge of the system – there is the potential for tornadoes. Any tornadoes that do develop will be brief and weak (70+ MPH winds)

Please stay weather aware during this time. Heed all Warnings and have multiple ways to receive them.

Ida Makes Landfall; Potential Local Impacts

As of 12:10 PM August 29th, Hurricane Ida has made landfall as a Category 4 Major Hurricane. The image below is the direct text from the National Hurricane Center.


Around our neck of the woods, we will start seeing impacts from Ida Monday night and Tuesday from west to east. Threats will include flash flooding, strong gusty winds, and a few tornadoes. Flood Watches are in effect for portions of west Alabama up to Interstate 65

FEMA & FCC Conducting Test Of Alert System on Wednesday, Aug. 11

FEMA and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will test the nation’s public alert and warning systems at 2:20 p.m. ET on Wednesday. FEMA regularly tests the public alert and warning systems to assess the operational readiness of the supporting infrastructure. The tests also help identify any needed technological and administrative improvements to the systems.
This week’s testing will be the sixth test of the nationwide public alert and warning systems and has been planned since June 2020. The purpose of the test is to assess the effectiveness of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) to receive and convey a national message via radio and television and of the Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) infrastructure to deliver a test message to mobile phones.
The EAS national test is very similar to regular monthly tests typically originated by state authorities. During the test, radios and televisions across the country may interrupt normal programming to play the EAS test message. The message may be delivered in English or Spanish. The EAS test message is approximately one minute long and the audio will say:
“This is a test of the National Emergency Alert System. This system was developed by broadcast and cable operators in voluntary cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Federal Communications Commission and local authorities to keep you informed in the event of an emergency. If this had been an actual emergency an official message would have followed the tone alert you heard at the start of this message. No action is required.”    
The visual message, which will only be displayed on televisions, may vary depending on the station. The message will include, at a minimum, the originator, event, location, valid time period of the message and the time the message was transmitted. For example, the text may read: “A Primary Entry Point system has issued a National Periodic Test for all of the United States beginning at 2:20 PM and ending at 2:50 PM on AUG 11, 2021 (station ID).”
The test message sent to the WEA infrastructure will only be received by specially configured phones and will read:
“THIS IS A TEST of the National Wireless Emergency Alert System. No action is needed.”
Only phones that have been opted in specifically to receive system test messages will display the test message, which will be in either English or Spanish, depending on the device’s language settings. Most mobile phones will not display the test message. In contrast, consumers will automatically receive real emergency alerts on compatible phones (even if they do not receive the test message).  Instructions for how to opt-in to receive the test message on mobile devices can be found here.
Through this test, FEMA and the FCC are partnering with various agencies and other stakeholder groups to assess information about the performance of the opt-in WEA test. This includes emergency managers and other stakeholders from the National Weather Service, the Alabama Emergency Management Agency, Harris County Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management in Texas, City of Los Angeles Emergency Management Department, New York City Emergency Management, Mendocino County Office of Emergency Services in California, Ohio Emergency Management Agency, Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management and Homeland Security, City of Philadelphia Office of Emergency Management, and the Utah Department of Public Safety. In addition, the FCC will gather information about EAS and WEA test performance directly from communications providers.
Information collected from this test will be used to improve EAS and WEA capabilities and testing procedures in the future.
More information about WEA and EAS can be found at Integrated Public Alert & Warning System | FEMA.gov.

Changes Coming to SPS, SVR Products August 2nd

The NWS will be making changes to the way SPS and SVR products are formated effective tomorrow, August 2nd.

The public will notice these changes when they hear their Weather Radio activate and when they read products from the National Weather Service.

The biggest change will be the addition of a Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) activation for Severe Thunderstorm (SVR) products that include the DESTRUCTIVE tag. Additionally, Special Weather Statements (SPS) products will no longer use the “Significant Weather Advisory” text as they will be transitioned to the Impact-Based Warning (IBW) format.

Severe Thunderstorm Warnings

There will be an additional bullet for Thunderstorm Damage Threat at the bottom of each product, where CONSIDERABLE or DESTRUCTIVE can be used – but by default will not be. As stated above, if DESTRUCTIVE is used, it will activate a WEA. Additionally, there will be a HAIL THREAT, MAX HAIL SIZE, WIND THREAT, and MAX WIND GUST tag that can be used.

  • The criteria for a destructive damage threat is at least 2.75 inch diameter (baseball-sized) hail and/or 80 mph thunderstorm winds. Warnings with this tag will automatically activate a Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) on smartphones within the warned area.
     
  • The criteria for a considerable damage threat is at least 1.75 inch diameter (golf ball-sized) hail and/or 70 mph thunderstorm winds. This will not activate a WEA.
     
  • The criteria for a baseline or “base” severe thunderstorm warning remains unchanged, 1.00 inch (quarter-sized) hail and/or 58 mph thunderstorm winds. This will not activate a WEA. When no damage threat tag is present, damage is expected to be at the base level.

The new IPW format will be as follows:

TORNADO…POSSIBLE (if selected)
THUNDERSTORM DAMAGE THREAT…CONSIDERABLE/DESTRUCTIVE (if selected)
HAIL THREAT…RADAR INDICATED/OBSERVED
MAX HAIL SIZE…X.XX IN
WIND THREAT…RADAR INDICATED/OBSERVED
MAX WIND GUST…XX MPH

READ MORE at https://www.weather.gov/news/072221-svr-wea


Special Weather Statements

An example of the new Special Weather Statement format is listed below. As stated above, “Significant Weather Advisory” is no longer used.

Both the National Weather Service in Huntsville and Birmingham will be using this new format starting August 2nd!

Special Weather Statement
National Weather Service Quad Cities IA IL
340 PM CDT MON MAY 4 2015
IAZ099-ILZ025-034-MOZ010-042200-
Hancock IL-Henderson IL-Lee IA-Clark MO340 PM CDT MON MAY 4 2015
…Strong thunderstorm will impact portions of Hancock, Henderson,
Lee, and Clark Counties through 500 PM CDT…

At 338 PM CDT, doppler radar was tracking a strong thunderstorm
near Keokuk, moving east at 30 mph.
HAZARD…40 mph wind gusts and penny size hail.
SOURCE…Radar indicated.
IMPACT…Minor damage possible to outdoor objects is possible.
Locations impacted include…
Keokuk, Fort Madison, Carthage, Nauvoo, Niota, Western Illinois
University, Hamilton, New Boston, Montrose, St. Francisville,
Charleston and Argyle.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...
Frequent cloud to ground lightning is occurring with this storm.
lightning can strike 15 miles away from a thunderstorm. Seek a safe
shelter inside a building or vehicle.

This storm may intensify, monitor local radio and tv stations, as
well as local cable tv outlets, for additional information and
possible warnings from the National Weather Service.

&&
LAT...LON 4034 9154 4055 9166 4070 9123 4037 9094

TIME...MOT...LOC 2038Z 259DEG 26KT 4045 9147
MAX HAIL SIZE...0.75 IN
MAX WIND GUST...40 MPH

More information and examples at https://nws.weather.gov/products/PDD/Sub_Severe_SPS_Examples.pdf

[U: Extended] Another Day Of Dangerous Heat

A large chunk of our Coverage Zones are under a Heat Advisory due to heat indices expected to reach 106F. This includes the Alabama counties of

Lauderdale, Colbert, Franklin AL, Lawrence, Marion, Lamar, Fayette, Winston, Walker, Pickens, Tuscaloosa, Jefferson, Shelby, Talladega, Sumter, Greene, Hale, Perry, Bibb, Chilton, Coosa, Tallapoosa. Marengo. Dallas, Autauga, Lowndes. Elmore, Montgomery, Macon, Bullock, Lee, Russell-Pike, Barbour,

Some counties are not in our Coverage Zones but have been included in this message

...HEAT ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM NOON TODAY TO 7 PM CDT THIS
EVENING...

* WHAT...Heat index values in the 105 to 107 degree range are
  expected across portions of the advisory area.

* WHERE...Lauderdale, Colbert, Franklin AL and Lawrence Counties.

* WHEN...From Noon today to 7 PM CDT this evening.

* IMPACTS...Hot temperatures and high humidity may cause heat
  illnesses to occur.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out
of the sun, and check up on relatives and neighbors. Young
children and pets should never be left unattended in vehicles
under any circumstances.

Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside. When
possible reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or
evening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat
 stroke. Wear lightweight and loose fitting clothing when possible.
To reduce risk during outdoor work, the Occupational Safety and
Health Administration recommends scheduling frequent rest breaks
 in shaded or air conditioned environments. Anyone overcome by heat
 should be moved to a cool and shaded location. Heat stroke is an
 emergency! Call 9 1 1.
...HEAT ADVISORY IN EFFECT UNTIL 7 PM CDT WEDNESDAY...

* WHAT...Heat index values near 105 each afternoon.

* WHERE...Blount, Etowah, Calhoun, Cherokee, Cleburne, St.
  Clair, Clay, Randolph and Chambers Counties.

* WHEN...Until 7 PM CDT Wednesday.

* IMPACTS...Hot temperatures and high humidity may cause heat
  illnesses to occur.


PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out
of the sun, and check up on relatives and neighbors. Young
children and pets should never be left unattended in vehicles
under any circumstances.

Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside. When
possible reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or
evening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat
 stroke. Wear lightweight and loose fitting clothing when
possible. To reduce risk during outdoor work, the Occupational
Safety and Health Administration recommends scheduling frequent
 rest breaks in shaded or air conditioned environments. Anyone
overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location.
Heat stroke is an emergency! Call 9 1 1.

&&

$$

ALZ011>015-022>025-027-030>037-039>050-280400-
/O.EXT.KBMX.HT.Y.0001.000000T0000Z-210729T0000Z/
Marion-Lamar-Fayette-Winston-Walker-Pickens-Tuscaloosa-Jefferson-
Shelby-Talladega-Sumter-Greene-Hale-Perry-Bibb-Chilton-Coosa-
Tallapoosa-Marengo-Dallas-Autauga-Lowndes-Elmore-Montgomery-Macon-
Bullock-Lee-Russell-Pike-Barbour-
Including the cities of Hamilton, Sulligent, Vernon, Fayette,
Double Springs, Jasper, Carrollton, Tuscaloosa, Birmingham,
Hoover, Columbiana, Pelham, Alabaster, Talladega, Sylacauga,
Livingston, Eutaw, Greensboro, Moundville, Marion, Centreville,
Clanton, Rockford, Alexander City, Dadeville, Demopolis, Linden,
Selma, Prattville, Fort Deposit, Hayneville, Wetumpka, Tallassee,
Montgomery, Tuskegee, Union Springs, Auburn, Opelika,
Phenix City, Troy, and Eufaula
118 PM CDT Tue Jul 27 2021

...HEAT ADVISORY NOW IN EFFECT UNTIL 7 PM CDT WEDNESDAY...

* WHAT...Heat index values 104 to 108 each afternoon.

* WHERE...Portions of west and south central Alabama.

* WHEN...Until 7 PM CDT Wednesday.

* IMPACTS...Hot temperatures and high humidity may cause heat
  illnesses to occur.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out
of the sun, and check up on relatives and neighbors. Young
children and pets should never be left unattended in vehicles
under any circumstances.

Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside. When
possible reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or
evening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat
 stroke. Wear lightweight and loose fitting clothing when
possible. To reduce risk during outdoor work, the Occupational
Safety and Health Administration recommends scheduling frequent
 rest breaks in shaded or air conditioned environments. Anyone
overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location.
Heat stroke is an emergency! Call 9 1 1.

Strong-Severe Storms, Flooding Concerns This Evening Into Overnight

Today’s Outlook from the Storm Prediction Center puts most of Coverage Zone 1 and portions of Coverage Zone 2 in a Marginal Risk for severe thunderstorms this evening, tonight and into the overnight hours.

The highest severe weather threat will remain to our north in the Slight Risk area.

Anticipated risks are 50-60 MPH wind gusts along with locally heavy rainfall. Parameters are not in place for tornadoes but remember severe thunderstorms can and occasionally do produce tornadoes. We have also been highlighted in a Slight Risk for excessive rainfall from the Weather Prediction Center.

Additionally, a Flash Flood Watch is in effect for Cullman, DeKalb, Jackson and Marshall counties as torrential rainfall from Claudette impacted the area and more heavy rainfall is on the way.

Flash Flood Watch In Effect

Counties Affected: Marshall, Jackson, DeKalb, Cullman

Alabama Hazards
URGENT - IMMEDIATE BROADCAST REQUESTED
Flood Watch
National Weather Service Huntsville AL
417 AM CDT Mon Jun 21 2021

ALZ008>010-016-212045-
/O.NEW.KHUN.FF.A.0007.210622T0000Z-210623T0000Z/
/00000.0.ER.000000T0000Z.000000T0000Z.000000T0000Z.OO/
Marshall-Jackson-DeKalb-Cullman-
Including the cities of Arab, Fort Payne, Guntersville, Cullman,
Boaz, Rainsville, Albertville, and Scottsboro
417 AM CDT Mon Jun 21 2021

...FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT FROM THIS EVENING THROUGH TUESDAY
EVENING...

The National Weather Service in Huntsville has issued a

* Flash Flood Watch for portions of north central Alabama and
  northeast Alabama, including the following areas, in north central
  Alabama, Cullman. In northeast Alabama, DeKalb, Jackson and
  Marshall.

* From this evening through Tuesday evening

* Showers and thunderstorms will increase in coverage this afternoon
  and evening, ahead of a slow-moving cold front. An additional 1-2
  inches of rain is expected, along with locally higher amounts.
  With nearly saturated soil conditions in the watch area, the
  rainfall will be efficiently converted to runoff, increasing the
  risk for life-threatening flash flooding.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Flash Flood Watch means that conditions may develop that lead to
Flash Flooding. Flash Flooding is a very dangerous situation. You
should monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action should
Flash Flood Warnings be issued.

Significant Flooding in Northport and Birmingham 6/19

Multiple reports and images were seen across social media of flooding across Northport and Tuscaloosa areas. A catastrophic Flash Flood Warning was in effect

Photos and videos below are courtesy of their author and were found via several meteorologists Twitter feeds

Tropical System Update; Flash Flood Watch Issued

Ahead of Potential-Tropical System 3 (which has yet to be named as of 5:30 CT), Tropical Storm Warnings are in effect for the northern Gulf Coast including New Orleans LA to Destin FL. Key messages for PTS 3 are as follows:

Flash Flood Watches are up for the southern half of Alabama north towards the Birmingham Metro

Flash flood risk over the next 3 days will be greatest for these areas; however it is important to note that there will be a flood threat over the entire state:

Outside of the flood threat, tropical storm-force winds of at least 40 MPH will be possible in some spots: